Bryce’s Chessex Updates

Bryce Lickfield of BrycesDice gave us at the DMC a recent update on Chessex news.  This is a consolidation of his posts with formatting adjustment but no content changes.

“Who would like a Chessex update straight from their recent supplier news letter? It is a lot, but it was what I thought this group would like to see.”

New Dice: Dice Menagerie #10:
Four of these six colors were sold at the summer shows last year. These are Festive™ Waterlily™/white, Festive™ Pop-Art™/blue, Festive™ Sunburst™/red, and Marble Oxi-Copper™/white. They were the four most popular colors that we showed last summer at consumer shows. Added to these four are two new colors that have not been shown previously, but we are confident they will be very popular. The fifth color is a new Borealis™ color using some old material that can no longer be bought. It was found
when the new owners of the factory were going through their stocks of material after their purchase and came across some of this “Maple” Borealis™ material. From the factory estimates, we think they can make enough dice to last us 3-4 years even with fantastic sales. The sixth color has a new effect that we think is particularly surprising and stunning. We don’t want to say what it is at this time so are naming it for now as the Mystery #7 Die Color.

If anyone is interested in or doesn’t remember what the first six mystery dice colors were, they were the first six colors of Frosted dice released in 2001. We will have samples to popularize this mystery dice color at the GAMA Trade Show in March in Reno, NV. Then it will be a mystery no more. If you can believe us, though, it will be very popular. Of the few people who have seen it, it truly is a die that will make you say “Wow!”

April through June 2019: “From the Laboratory™” Polyhedral 7-Die Sets:
We have spent a lot of time in the laboratory at the German dice factory these past few years creating new colors. We now have many good colors that will be popular. Concurrently, the factory has figured out a way to produce smaller production runs. We decided the best way to introduce these colors into the market is by releasing them with smaller production runs and only making the polyhedral shapes and some 16mm d6 with pips available. Because of the shorter production runs, the retail for these polyhedral 7-die sets will be $11.98 instead of the usual $9.98. If any of these dice are really popular, we will re-release them in the future in all shapes, most likely in another Dice Menagerie. If the initial orders for these dice are more than we made, then we will allocate based on each customers overall purchases in 2018 and their percentage of our overall sales. We anticipate not needing to allocate, though. We will release around 24 colors between the beginning of April and the end of June, most likely in two
releases. After that, we should be able to release another 24 colors in the last quarter of this year.

July 2019: Gemini™ Dice #8:
We have not finalized all six of these new Gemini™ colors, but we should know them by March.  August 2019 and Beyond:  There are many more new colors of dice that we want to release this year. They include six new colors of Speckled dice, at least the before mentioned 24 more “from the Laboratory™” colors, and some dice using new effects. All-in-all, we are releasing a lot of new dice this year! Changes for 2019 from 2018
Other than the changes to the translucent dice detailed earlier, there aren’t any changes to the retail prices or the product range from 2018 to 2019 at this time and aren’t likely to be any the rest of this year. Some discontinued colors are running out of stock, though. These will be detailed in an upcoming Chessex Scoop™ publication. The biggest changes for us have been external and are mentioned later on this page. Change from “KIS™” to “Classic” Designated Name We never liked the term “KIS” for the “Keeping In Stock” dice colors. These colors have been good selling colors but not quite as good as others that end up in the Signature™ or main Gemini™ ranges of dice. The concept is to aid retailers with their purchasing decisions. There are no stock number or name changes for the dice themselves involved with this category name change.

Changes at Our Dice Factory Sources:
Last year, the German dice factory changed owners. The former owner was 96 years old and did not want to invest in expanding the production capacity of his factory. The new owners are much younger and owned a factory that made similar items. They have been able to combine the production capacity of the two factories and we have been receiving more dice than before the sale. This is wonderful news as our fill ratio has improved dramatically over these past few months and we are now able to bring out many new dice colors, ones we have wanted to release for some time. The dice factory in Denmark, where we purchase our opaque and speckled dice, has also changed owners. Sadly, the former owner suddenly passed away this past August 21st. We had been purchasing from him since 1990. He was responsible for Chessex focusing more on dice because he was the first person that made a unique and exclusive dice range (speckled, which the factory first tested in the 1950’s but never developed until we met in 1990) that we were able to offer to the market. This led us eventually making contact with the dice factory in Germany and the development of the dice ranges from them. It is pretty safe to say that without him, there would be no speckled, Signature™, Classic (formerly KIS™), or
Gemini dice ranges that we have today. The former owner’s son is taking over the factory and we don’t expect to see any drop in their production capacity. Actually, we should see a slight increase because just before the former owner’s passing, he ordered a new mold for the Tens 10 die which will increase their production capacity. We are sorry to see the passing of the former owner but are heartened that his son is taking over to continue the family business.

Borealis Update:
Change to new Borealis Maple Green Color! On our 2019 update we released that one of our new colors set for a March release would be Borealis Maple Green w/silver. Instead of silver, the paint color for the numbers will now be yellow. The new color will be Borealis Maple Green w/yellow.

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Chessex News, Part 3: Speckled Dice

At Spiel in October, Michael Schäffer from the DMC sat down with Donald Reents from Chessex. The interview lasted 2 1/2 hours, and we’ll be releasing the information in parts. Part 1: Borealis and Part 2: Test Sets were already published. This is Part 3: Speckled Dice!

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Background.  Sadly, the Chessex family suffered a loss in 2018: Jørgen, the owner of the Chessex speckled factory, passed away. He contributed many named sets in the speckled line and created color combinations for the pounds of dice. He is succeeded by his son, Kasper, who has taken over the speckled line and is eager to start creating new speckled sets.

New Speckled.  Donald confirmed that creating new speckled colors is something he wants to do.  There haven’t been new speckled colors since 2004.  One possible reason why is that the materials come straight from the speckled factory, and their pigments are commonly used in things like toilet seats and switch plates, which aren’t typically in “interesting” colors.  But they still plan on experimenting with new speckled combinations in 2019.  They thought about doing Funfetti, but couldn’t get them ready in time for Spiel.   They made test colors for speckled, but only a couple of them turned out alright.  But after Spiel and Lucca (conventions), Donald said that he’d be visiting the speckled factory and mixing new colors.

Jumbo.  One DMCer asked about jumbo sets.  Chessex explained that the problem is that jumbo dice become cost prohibitive.  The reason jumbo dice like 34mm d20s are only in speckled and opaque are because the cost increase for the signature colors causes such a higher price point that Donald doubts he’ll be able to sell them at that price.  However, he did state that a speckled jumbo line is a possibility, but it’s all dependent upon cost.

Release.  Though Chessex is planning new speckled dice, it sounds like they’d be prototyped after the test colors release, and that release will include only “signature” designs.  However, speckled could potentially be in a release after that along with translucent and/or opaque colors.  Though Chessex wants to keep speckled separate from signature designs, they wouldn’t release speckled by themselves.

Random Facts:  Donald pointed out that speckled dice like lotus, fire, and earth look drastically different from one decade to the next.  This difference in consistency is similar to the changes in the scarab lines from batch to batch – they can differ in the exact mixing of the colors.  Also, one DMCer brought up color-coded dice sets where each die is a different color.  Donald said that Chessex tried that with a speckled Kaleidoscope set (25399), but the set didn’t sell.  Chessex thought it would do well since people playing D&D would more quickly be able to identify the dice, but it just didn’t do well in sales.

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And that sums up Chessex’s thoughts on the speckled line!  We hope you’ve enjoyed this article series.  Stay tuned for the final part, where we summarize all other content and provide the complete interview transcript.

Photo Credits:
Featured Image – Michael Schäffer
Picture 1 – Paulina Drozdowska
Picture 2 – Michael Schäffer

Dice Hoarding: Accumulating Treasure

Why We Collect Dice

When I tell people I collect dice, they usually don‘t understand.  I’ve been speculating about why we collect dice – what are our reasons? I’ve identified some factors that compel people to collect. This is not a comprehensive list, but it’s a glimpse into why we acquire so many dice.

Gotta Catch ‘em All

When I first began collecting dice, I thought “hey, I can just get them all.” I had this overwhelming Pokemon need to complete sets of different styles. It started with frosted and progressed from there. I’ve since backed way off because there are so many styles and brands, and the amount of dice companies producing unique products have increased even since I’ve joined the DMC. It’s much more realistic to focus on a single brand or even style. And it’s cheaper, if you’re going the Chessex route, to collect the in-print sets of a style. Even the most hardcore collectors in the group (Kevin Cook, Michael Schaffer) can’t get every single die ever made. Between casino dice, promotional d6s, polyhedral sets, board game dice, expensive artisan dice, and more… it’s just too overwhelming. But DMCers get the urge in us to finish collections, check item numbers off a list, and get all the dicey goodness they can.

Variety/Appearance

People are dynamic. We might pick favorite colors, styles, or types of dice, but many of us own a wide variety.  DMC members have different tastes and can collect on a spectrum of colors, styles, and shapes. That’s why you’ll see someone ask something like “I don’t own any purple dice – what do you recommend?” My first set I bought for myself was Chessex opaque grey. Grey is my favorite color, but I still buy sparkly dice, swirly dice, bright pink dice, etc. You know those gamers who have a single set of polyhedral and that’s it? They might have a set that fits them, but they can’t change sets based on mood.

Multiple Characters

People also collect dice for different characters.  For example, I’m a dungeon master in D&D. I might play with my black/red dice if my players are fighting demons. I could bring out teal Borealis for an underwater adventure. When I’m a player, I have 3-4 sets I’ll use for my wizard (and only my wizard); I use my Q-workshop dragons only for my dragon-slayer paladin. So we get an array of dice to represent out tastes, personalities, or character’s personalities.

We like Choosing Which We Are

Though individual dice collectors are more diverse than a single colorway or style, we still like identifying with a certain element or category. I’m in this Harry Potter house. I’m in that Game of Thrones house. I’d be this power ranger. I’m this character in Star Trek. We like to select something that represents us whether it’s a zodiac sign, Meyers Briggs test, or – that’s right – DICE! When the new Chessex test sets came out in 2018, I didn‘t want them all. I saw Marble Oxi-Copper and said “that one is me.” Even when I’m culling my collection, I said the frosted smoke and clear were the most “me.” So, wait… wouldn’t that be the opposite of collecting – just choosing one? Nope! Because I own several sets of Gamescience that are “me.” And maybe I pick an entire Chessex style that is “me.”

Happiness/Mental Health

This is more serious of a subject, but dice bring many of us happiness and stability. It’s a distraction to get online and look at dice pictures, to browse shops for dice, to ink dice, to sort dice, etc. Sometimes it’s a welcome distraction from serious mental health problems, and sometimes it’s a distraction from daily stress in life.  At a time when people plug into social media 24/7 and news can be depressing, it’s important to spend some of your plugged-in time with something pleasant. That’s why the DMC is so important – no religion, no politics, no tragedy – just a comforting space we try to keep drama free. Some DMCers have made substantial connections to other collectors. There are meet-ups at cons, and even friending other members can gain you lifelong friends.

Conclusion

Embrace the hobby! While keeping dice purchases reasonable and on-budget is important, it’s also important to keep yourself happy. Connecting with others in the DMC community is rewarding. So whether you‘re scratching the need for completion, considering color styles, or distracting yourself from everyday life, dice hoarding can be therapeutic! Do you collect for a different reason? Let us know in the comments!

photo credit: Michael Schäffer

Dice Shipping Tips and Tricks

Before I joined the DMC, I barely ever shipped anything.  But after a few weeks in the DMC, I started doing trades and eventually some sales in the Dice Market group.  Since then, I’ve learned a lot about shipping dice.  I’m sure there’s more out there to learn, but here are some useful tips and advice for shipping dice out.

Keeping Costs Down

A great way to save costs is to keep dice in bubble mailers.  A common reason to use a smaller box instead of a mailer is to ship the cubes that dice like Chessex, Halfsies, and some Koplow come in.  If you’re doing a trade or just swapping with someone who has some extra boxes, you might ask to just send the dice and inserts (labels) without the box.  For example, I don’t keep my dice in boxes, so I’m fine with people shipping dice to me not in packaging.  Boxes make a difference in shipping costs due to weight, and they can often crack in shipping.

Another easy way to keep costs down when shipping is to hit up the dollar store – not Dollar General, but stores like the Dollar Tree where items are literally a dollar.  I tend to buy bubble mailers from there because they have packs of two for a dollar.  These cheap mailers are usually just a bit more padded than a regular envelope, but there are also usually bubble mailers (the ones here are usually bright red) for a dollar that are a little more secure. 

Tape can also be purchased from a dollar tree type store, but I caution you there.  I actually prefer to spend the money on a bit nicer packing tape just because I’m willing to spend a little more to avoid swearing at the tape as it peels off in thin fringes.  However, if you’re careful and patient, you can save some money buying tape at a dollar store, too.

Convenience

My post office is about 20 minutes from my house.  To avoid the drive when I don’t need to leave, I print out labels from PayPal.  It’s really not hard!  The only thing is that you’ll have to estimate weight if you don’t have a shipping scale.   If you ship often, it may be worth getting a shipping scale to get the weight exact.   MAKE SURE you 1) set it to first class, and 2) set the DATE to the appropriate day it’s getting picked up.  If you print it out at 11 o’clock at night, for example, make sure you change the date to the NEXT day.

Important:  You can print a shipping label from PayPal even if you didn’t use eBay and even if the recipient didn’t pay goods and services.  Just go to https://www.paypal.com/shiplabel/create/  

Traveling Dice Boxes and Other Flat Rate Shipments

If you’re mailing a lot of dice, flat rate boxes are an option.  I recommend putting the dice in a box and just having the address handy when you go to the post office.  Ask them to let you know how much it would be to mail in a regular box, and they’ll usually weigh it and give you a price.  That way you can opt for a flat rate box if it’s cheaper to flat rate box the shipment.  Sometimes it isn’t cheaper to do it that way.  But – handy tip – you can request that the post office drops off some flat rate boxes for free (usually in sets of 10).  It’s nice to have extras around sometimes!

Ship Securely!  

Protecting dice is key.  1) Do not ship dice loosely just in the mailer.  Put them in a zip bag, drawstring bag, or wrap them in plastic.  2) Consider wrapping everything in a plastic bag, especially if you’re shipping several sets.  These steps are to prevent dice from falling out if there’s damage to the box or mailer.  3) Take a picture of everything you’re sending.  4) Take a picture of the receipt from the post office.  These steps are in case something gets lost.

International Shipping

International shipping is awfully expensive. If you’re mailing even a few dice from the States to a European country, for example, it’s still going to run I’d guess between $12-15.  That’s why it’s worthwhile to trade in large bunches if sending overseas.  However, you can put a few d6s in a regular envelope.  Note that it’s high risk to do that.  They can get damaged easier, and you never know if they’re going to arrive safely or if they’ll have extra postage due upon arrival.  Do this at your own risk.

Side note about Australia:  Australia is the most expensive place I’ve ever shipped dice to.  So think critically before trading or selling with an Australian location.  And know that if someone quotes you a large price to ship to or from Australia – it’s not their fault.  It really is that high.  Yes, even for Kickstarters.  Yes, even for Australian-friendly KSes.  I’m sure there are some similar expensive locations in Eastern Europe and Asia.  Just be aware that even a small bubble mailer can cost upwards of $20.

Have some additional shipping tips?  Please share in the comments!

Gamescience Numbers Part 2: Paint Markers

Not to be overlooked, the first step of coloring in any Gamescience or precision edge numbered dice is to choose a color.  I find that asking for suggestions in the DMC can lead to ideas that never crossed my mind.  But then, every once in a while I get a set that inspires me enough, and no suggestions are required.  So for my discussion on inking Gamescience, I’ll be showing some examples of inking an orange set with a couple of stray green d20s.

Cleaning the Dice

I have a confession to make.  I don’t clean my dice before I ink them.  I know it’s a common practice in painting miniatures as well as dice inking.  But the only time I’ve cleaned dice before inking them was with a visibly dirty old bunch of Windmill dice.  Otherwise, I’ve never bothered.  So while some dice-inking veterans would start with this step, know that it isn’t a dire requirement.  It honestly has to do with your own preference and how clean the dice are to begin with.  If you do decide to ink them, the preferred method seems to be lukewarm water and dish soap then setting them out to dry.

Tools of the Inking Trade

One of the most common questions in the DMC are “what do you ink dice with?”  As you may have seen in Part 1 of this series, even crayons will work.  So I encourage anyone wondering that question to instead think “what do I WANT to ink them with?  When I ink Gamescience, Windmills, or Diamond Dice (or if I had Armory), I use Uni-Posca paint markers with an extra fine tip.  I like how they feel when they ink the dice.  However, I used to use Sharpie paint markers with an ultra fine tip, and they’re very similar.  I have had great success using regular Sharpie permanent markers (not paint) on acrylic dice, but I personally prefer paint markers for precision edge.

What else can be used?  Some DMC members have used gel pens, regular pens, regular markers, and jars of acrylic paint.  My recommendation is to start with something you already own.  If you don’t have anything available or wish to move onto something else, I recommend finding a craft store with a simple color of sharpie paint marker like gold, silver, white, or black – something you might use often.  Try them out.  But if you already have gel pens or something felt tip – try it out.  Just try it on dice that you’re not attached to – something that can be messed up, just in case.

Removing Ink

To clean up after myself, I use 90% rubbing alcohol and paper towels when using paint markers.  But that’s with my own ink.  I’ve never had to remove ink from a polymer set.  For that, I’d recommend trying rubbing alcohol first with either a toothpick or q-tip.  ALWAYS test any chemical solution on a die you aren’t attached to.  Some DMCers have used acetone or nail polish remover, but with mixed results.  

Technique

It’s honestly hard to explain how to ink dice.  For one, it’s something you have to do to understand.  For another, there’s no widespread consensus.  I, personally, slop my paint marker on the numbers without concern or care.  I especially don’t try to be “pretty” with d20s because the numbers are smaller, and there’s no sense in fussing over it when it wipes away so cleanly.  However, there are some exceptions.  

First, d4’s – they’re sometimes a little more shallow, making it easier to wipe off paint.  With practice, it’ll be easier to clean up without wiping the ink out, but when starting out, being careful on the d4 will save you some headaches.  Second, d24’s – they’re the absolute worst to ink.  If you’re focusing on regular polyhedral dice, then you don’t have to worry about this at all.  But if you have Zocchi sets of Gamescience, be very careful with the d24.  It’s the most difficult die to clean up after.  Sometimes it’s worthwhile to very carefully ink the numbers and not clean up at all.  So inking the d24 is more of a skill.  Finally, the d3 can be a bit of a challenge.  The numbers are fine – very easy to ink.  But the letters (R, P, S for rock, paper, and scissors) are less deep.  This takes some practice, and I’d rate it more difficult than the d4 but not as difficult as the d24.  Again, if you’re working with standard polyhedral, it’s not a concern.

So, how do you actually do it?  I, personally, slop the ink on.  It doesn’t have to be perfect at all because it’s easy to clean up: 

I then put some rubbing alcohol on a piece of paper towel.  I try to make sure it isn’t soaking, but I make sure there’s a decent amount.  When I wipe off the number face, I sort of visualize just wiping off the surface.  It’s not about pressing down, or you’ll get the alcohol into the groove, which isn’t what you’re trying to do.  I just wipe away from myself, flat, as though I’m wiping just the surface and nothing else.  If you do wipe a little too much off, that’s okay.  You can do touch-ups after the ink dries a little.

It takes some practice, and the paper towel can’t be drenched.  Also, you can only do it so much before you need another paper towel piece, especially if you’re working with a bright or metallic color, and especially if you’re not being careful with the inking (like I’m not).  I can do a die with a little piece of paper towel, maybe two.  But I usually get a new scrap of paper towel after a d20 or anything really messy.

Conclusion

There you have it!  This is by no means a comprehensive or advanced look at dice inking, but it’s a thorough overview with some advice for people new to dice inking.  Remember if you’re interested in using crayon on the number to check out Part 1 of this article:  Gamescience Numbers Part 1: Crayons.  Though part 2 completes this pair of articles, I’m a bit of a Gamescience fangirl, so there will certainly be more precision-edged dice articles to come.

Gamescience Numbers Part 1: Crayons

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Photo by Tom Hack

One day in the DMC, Tom Hack said that he couldn’t be the only one who uses crayons on dice. Jon McDaniel contributed an expertly crayoned Gamescience set using white crayon. The thread was inspiring, with many dice maniacs providing advice on crayoning.

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Photo by Jon McDaniel

I’ve used crayon before, but it was on early polyhedral dice from AD&D sets that were rough looking to say the least. Back then, the junk crayon use was a formality to get the numbers colored in just enough to read. They weren’t pretty. It was like coloring a beach ball with chalk.

Fast forward a few decades later, and why wouldn’t I try crayoning my Gamescience? Because of a gaudily-garbed druid NPC named Lucynil Font, I had an ever-growing set of “ugly” opaque Gamescience, and many in that expanding set still needed some coloring. So I set on my task to try crayoning in the numbers on precision dice.

Lessons Learned

IMG_3785Effort: Technically speaking, crayoning dice is much more hard work. You need to press down hard to get the wax into the crevice, and sometimes you need to go over it multiple times to replace wax that comes out. You need to get at the grooves from different angles. At first I was trying to “color” in the numbers, but I soon realized that it wasn’t a matter of filling it in. It was more like scratching off a lottery ticket.

Technique: In addition to mastering the different angles and applying more pressure than paint markers, I also had to learn how to clean up the waxy mess. With ink, I usually made a hot mess with the paint and cleaned it up with some rubbing alcohol on a paper towel. Being a parent, I turned to wipes to clean off the wax. That was a mistake. Wet cleaning does NOT work on wiping wax clean as well as dry paper towels or napkins. In fact, I soon learned to place the die on a napkin or paper towel and wax away. Then throw the wax-covered napkin away and replace it. Then keep it on the clean napkin while cleaning it off with a new one – and repeat. The idea is to keep the napkin clean because if it’s too covered in wax, it gets right back onto the die.

IMG_3825Tools: The only crayons I had on hand were Crayola and Playskool. Crayola seemed to cause less of a mess, and there were obviously more color options there. Playskool seemed to go into the grooves much easier (with less pressure), but the chunks also came back out of the grooves more often. So Crayola wins that battle. I didn’t notice any difference in ease of coloring between colors of the same brand.

Zocchi: Much like with inking, certain dice were more difficult to master than others. Just like with inking, d24s are a pain. I actually gave up on the d24 and opted to ink it instead. It was a dark purple, and colors wouldn’t show up with waxy crayon as well for some reason. The d3s took some finesse to learn, but it was actually easier to crayon in the R, P, S letters than it was with paint marker. Zocchi d5’s were comparable with crayon as with ink – no problems there. The d14s and d16s seem easier with ink; those are super easy to do with a paint marker. But chunks of crayon seem to come back out of the deeper grooves for those.

Fun: The first night I tried out crayoning, I accosted my 6-year-old son’s box of crayons. I set out a bunch of colorful dice, and of course he wanted to be part of it. So we sat there and colored in the dice. He had trouble coloring in the whole thing, so I kept him to d6s and dice with less sides. He wasn’t as patient with the process as I was, but he had a lot of fun helping me choose “ugly” combinations. I couldn’t let him color in with ink, or I’d have a huge mess. But the crayon is more kid friendly, and without the lingering smell of rubbing alcohol when it’s clean-up time.

Conclusion

I will not be forsaking my paint markers for crayons. Even though wax is a fun alternative to paint, it’s a lot more difficult. However, I will be returning to crayons eventually. They were a good fit for the “ugly” dice theme because they offered more color options. Putting tan crayola on permafrost felt deliciously heretical. And the nostalgia factor is real. I haven’t crayoned dice since the 80s. But I would recommend limiting crayons to a single color on a single set to minimize effort and mess. Keep in mind that it does take more pressure and time to wax in the numbers and clean up the mess than it does with ink.

How does inking differ? Stay tuned for part 2!
Want to write an article of your own on your precision-dice inking experiences? Contact Joss Hevel in the DMC.

Rainbow Dice

One of the more common questions in the Dice Maniacs Club is “where can I get rainbow dice?” or “what rainbow dice would you recommend?”  With pride month upon us, this article takes a look at some of the many rainbow dice options.  It’s important to keep in mind that the rainbow styles available are often available across several different retailers.  The goal of this article is not to sell you a particular set from a particular store. Instead, this overview should provide you with a lot of options and some brightly colored dice shinies for your viewing pleasure!

Exclusives

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Over the Rainbow by Kraken

 

 

There are two stand-out, exclusive rainbow sets among the many rainbow options.  First, Kraken has a set of polymer rainbow dice with the Kraken symbol on the 20 face, gold inking for numbers, and a semi-translucent style.  Though currently sold out as of this post, they are not planned to be a limited edition and should be back in stock eventually.  The dice come in 11-piece sets and are available at krakendice.com

 

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Gemstone Metal Rainbow by Die Hard Dice

Looking for a metal option?  Die Hard Dice is currently offering a metal gemstone line, and a rainbow set (one of each gemstone color) is offered as a mixed set.  The gemstone glitter is an exclusive Die Hard Dice creation, and rainbow dice purchases during June support The Trevor Project.  The 7-piece set can be found at dieharddice.com along with an expansive rainbow dice selection.

 

Scorched

A metal rainbow set that can be found almost anywhere is the “scorched rainbow.”  The metal poly looks like an oil slick-style rainbow singed material that has been wildly popular among gamers.  The set is typically available with scorched-looking numbers, golden numbering, or white numbering depending on the retailer.  Kraken put their own twist on the set by branding the Kraken logo on the 20 face, and Die Hard Dice has a set that’s in the shape of their popular forge line, where the sharp tips of the metal polyhedrals are truncated.

 

HengDa and other Rainbow Polymer Sets

 

Beyond the exclusive rainbow sets, there are several rainbow polymer options that can be found at different retailers.  HengDa already had a rainbow set – one of the first mass produced – and have since added the translucent rainbow to their ever-expanding lineup.  

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There is another rainbow option with more of a tie dye feel and slightly brighter tones than HengDa’s sets.  This set can be found on sites like wish, aliexpress, amazon, and a few U.S. retailers like 6d6Studio.  The set offers a brighter alternative to the HengDa coloring, but with wavier lines between the layers.

An Underrated Option

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Koplow’s Rainbow Dice from DarkElfDice

Amidst the plethora of rainbow dice options sporting sparkle, glitter, metal, icons, and translucence, this little set from Koplow doesn’t get much love.  The plain white opaque dice are often overlooked in lieu of more obvious rainbow options, but the subtle styling of inked numbering in different colors makes Koplow’s rainbow dice a unique option.

 

Recent and Upcoming Kickstarters

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Bescon’s Midnight Candy from Amazon

 

C-EL is a recently-delivered Kickstarter by Bescon and designed by the Dice Maniacs Club’s own Hague Nikolayczyk.  C-el is a glow-in-the-dark polyhedral project including a rainbow set of dice called Midnight Candy.  The kickstarter page can be found here, and the dice are now available to the masses at Amazon by searching for Midnight Candy.

 

 

 

One of the more popular posts ever to grace the DMC group was a recent glimpse at an upcoming Kickstarter for LGBT flag colored dice.  The teaser revealed five sets of dice with hearts on the twenty-face.  The dice colors represent groups like bisexual, pansexual, and asexual.  Hailed by many DMC members as a much-needed representation in gaming dice, the Kickstarter is bound to be a popular KS for the LGBT and its allies.  This KS is currently planned for the end of June 2018.

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The End of the Rainbow

That concludes the DMC blog’s look at rainbow polyhedral sets.  Keep in mind that there are variant options out there like translucent mixed sets, unicorn dice in one of each translucent colors, and many brightly colored homemade ETSY creations.  This article serves as a glance at some currently popular options and is not a comprehensive look at every rainbow die ever produced.  Whether you’re looking to celebrate pride month or just add some bright colors to your gaming arsenal, rainbow polyhedrals are a trend in gaming that have been a long time coming.